University of Sussex scored a “C-” on the University Global Health Impact Guide. Learn why and see how other schools compare.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

University of Sussex

Total

Grand Total Score: 43.24% (out of XXX?) Grand Total Grade: C-

Innovation

Total Score: 40%
Grade: C-

Research Funding

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Why does this matter?

As nonprofit institutions conducting publicly-funded research for the good of society, universities can and should be researching diseases that primarily affect the world's poor and are neglected by for-profit medical research.

Where does the data come from?

Data was extracted from 5 medical funding bodies: Department for International Development - Research for Development (R4D) database; European Commission - Community Research and Development Information System (CORDIS); Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Grants Database; Research Councils UK - Gateway to Research Database; Wellcome Trust - awarded grants spreadsheets

How can universities improve?

Work towards a goal of 10-15% of health research resources directed to neglected diseases. More grants aren't the only way; universities can also recruit more faculty and students who specialize in these diseases, ensure they receive adequate training and support, and urge funders to increase overall investment in this area.

Q

What proportion of medical research funding for each university is devoted to neglected diseases?

A
£1,026,989/£61,271,810 (1.7%)
1 (out of 5)

Research Funding

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Why does this matter?

As leading institutions with global recognition and influence on improving global health policy, universities should promote 
the quality and equality of people’s health around the world through research.

Where does the data come from?

Data was extracted from 5 medical funding bodies: Department for International Development - Research for Development (R4D) database; European Commission - Community Research and Development Information System (CORDIS); Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Grants Database; Research Councils UK - Gateway to Research Database; Wellcome Trust - awarded grants spreadsheets

How can universities improve?

Work towards a goal of 10-15% of health research resources directed to health in developing countries. More grants aren't the only way; universities can also recruit more faculty and students who specialize in these areas, ensure they receive adequate training and support, and urge funders to increase overall investment in this area.

Q

What percentage of the overall medical research funding for each university is devoted to health in Low-Income and Lower-Middle Income countries?

A
£1,206,879/£61,271,810 (2%)
1 (out of 5)

Research Output

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Why does this matter?

As nonprofit institutions conducting publicly-funded research for the good of society, universities can and should be researching diseases that primarily affect the world's poor and are neglected by for-profit medical research.

Where does the data come from?

For each institution, we calculated an index score based on the total number of neglected disease-related publications and the total number publications in biomedical research. A comprehensive search query was used to obtain data from the PubMed database.

How can universities improve?

Work towards a goal of 10-15% of health research resources directed to neglected diseases. More grants aren't the only way; universities can also recruit more faculty and students who specialize in these diseases, ensure they receive adequate training and support, and urge funders to increase overall investment in this area.

Q

What proportion of the university’s total PubMed publications (denominator) are focused on neglected diseases, including neglected aspects of HIV, TB, malaria (numerator)?

A
2/373 (0.5%)
2 (out of 5)

Research Output

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Why does this matter?

As leading institutions with global recognition and influence on improving global health policy, universities should promote 
the quality and equality of people’s health around the world by advancing rigorous research

Where does the data come from?

For each institution, we calculated an index score based on the total number of relevant publications and the total number publications in biomedical research. A comprehensive search query was used to obtain data from the PubMed database.

How can universities improve?

Work towards a goal of 10-15% of health research resources directed to health in Low- and Middle-Income countries. More grants aren't the only way; universities can also recruit more faculty and students who specialize in these areas, ensure they receive adequate training and support, and urge funders to increase overall investment in this area.

Q

What percentage of the university’s total PubMed publications (denominator) are focused on health in Low-Income and Lower-Middle-Income countries (numerator)?

A
10/373 (2.7%)
4 (out of 5)

Other Global Health Work

Access

Total Score: 46.5%
Grade: C

Commitment to Health Access

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Why does this matter?

Even when university research leads to a major medical innovation, there's no guarantee it will reach people in Low- and Middle-Income countries. Universities often license their innovations to pharmaceutical companies that charge high prices for the final products. But universities can adopt socially responsible licensing policies that make those products more affordable in poorer countries.

Where does the data come from?

Public records of university endorsement of global access licensing principles (such as the “Statement of Principles and Strategies for the Equitable Dissemination of Medical Technologies” and university websites) and responses to surveys sent to universities.

How can universities improve?

Adopt a public commitment to socially responsible or “global access” licensing for university medical innovations. The strongest commitments are detailed, specific, and prioritize licenses that enable low-price generic versions of new treatments in Low- and Middle-Income countries.

Q

Has the university officially and publicly committed to licensing its health related technologies in ways that promote access and affordability in developing countries?

A

The university has made no public commitment to access licensing, but the TTO reports commitment to the general principle of access licensing.

1.5 (out of 5)

Transparency

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Why does this matter?

Everyone has a stake in university health research - patients, medical professionals, and the public that funds much of this work. Universities should disclose whether they use socially responsible licenses that promote affordability and access for all.

Where does the data come from?

Systematic appraisal of university websites and university technology transfer websites.

How can universities improve?

Disclose information about socially responsible licensing commitments and practices on the website of the university's technology transfer office.

Q

Does the website of the university's technology transfer office OR the university’s website make an effort to disclose, explain and promote access licensing commitments and practices?

A

The website makes no reference to promoting global access through socially responsible licensing.

1 (out of 5)

Non-exclusive Licensing

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Why does this matter?

When universities share their research innovations under open or “non-exclusive” licenses, no single company gets a monopoly. Instead, many developers can license the innovation and work collaboratively or competitively to bring it to market, lowering the cost of drug development and the price of the final product.

Where does the data come from?

Questionnaires sent to university technology transfer offices, or in some cases, responses to requests made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (indicated below the grading of the question when this is the source of information).

How can universities improve?

Prioritize open, non-exclusive licensing of university technologies to promote competitive development and affordable end-products.

Q

In the past year, what percentage of the university’s licenses for health-related technologies (e.g. medicines, vaccines, diagnostics) were non-exclusive?

A
0-10%
1 (out of 5)

Developing World Patents

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Why does this matter?

When a medical research innovation is patented in a certain country, no one there is allowed develop products from it without a license from the patent holder. Patents in Low- and Middle-Income countries may block locally-produced, affordable versions of new medicines.

Where does the data come from?

Questionnaires sent to university technology transfer offices, or in some cases, responses to requests made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (indicated below the grading of the question when this is the source of information).

How can universities improve?

Refrain from seeking patents or “file and abandon” patents in low- and middle-income countries, leaving generic drug makers there free to produce low-cost versions of medicines developed from the university's research.

Q

In the past year, for what percentage of all health-related technologies (e.g. medicines, vaccines, diagnostics) did the university seek patents in Low- and Middle-Income countries where they may restrict access?

Q

Upper-Middle Income Countries

A
0-20%
5 (out of 5)
Q

Low and Lower-Middle Income Countries

A
0-20%
5 (out of 5)

Access to Innovations

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Why does this matter?

Drug companies often pay universities for an “exclusive license” that gives them monopoly rights over a university medical innovation. This can lead to very expensive end products - but universities can include “global access” licensing provisions to make the resulting medicines affordable in Low- and Middle-Income countries.

Where does the data come from?

Questionnaires sent to university technology transfer offices, or in some cases, responses to requests made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (indicated).

How can universities improve?

Include global access provisions in 100% of exclusive licenses for university technologies. A list of sample provisions is available here

Q

Part A: In the past year, what percentage of the university’s exclusive licenses of health technologies included provisions to promote access to those technologies in developing countries?

A
0-20%
1 (out of 5)
Q

Part B: What percentage of those access provisions included upper middle income countries in their scope?

A
0-20%
1 (out of 5)

Access to Research

?

Why does this matter?

Drug companies often pay universities for an “exclusive license” that gives them monopoly rights over a university medical innovation. This can lead to very expensive end products - but universities can include “global access” licensing provisions to make the resulting medicines affordable in Low- and Middle-Income countries.

Where does the data come from?

Questionnaires sent to university technology transfer offices, or in some cases, responses to requests made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (indicated).

How can universities improve?

Include global access provisions in 100% of exclusive licenses for university technologies. A list of sample provisions is available here.

Q

Does the university make an effort to promote and facilitate public-access publication by researchers?

A

The University website encourages public-access publication, provides publishing guidelines for common research funding sources, and explains Green and Gold open access. The website highlights an open access fund for paying article processing fees, but not an institutional open access policy.

4 (out of 5)

Availability

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Why does this matter?

Unfortunately scientists, students and the public can’t afford to access papers, which are locked up behind expensive paywalls. In contrast, the scientific and scholarly process relies on wide dissemination of findings in order to accelerate future discovery and innovations. This wide dissemination is best achieved by making research openly available online. Further, as taxpayers we fund the vast majority of this research, and as such have a right to access the outcomes.

Where does the data come from?

Journal articles indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central, accounting for a one-year article embargo period. Searches were conducted by two independent researchers. It is important to note, that our figures represent freely accessible papers, not the number of Open Access papers.

How can universities improve?

Universities can ensure that funds are available to researchers to pay article processing charges, or enable researchers to make a version of their work available through an institutional repository. Universities can also adopt institutional policies that encourage public-access publication by researchers. You can find out more about Open Access here and about increasing the effectiveness of a policy here.

Q

Is the university’s research published in a way that is freely accessible to everyone?

A
90-98%
4 (out of 5)